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UNESCO Adds Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings to World Heritage List


The 20th century architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright has been added to the UNESCO world heritage list alongside an ancient Aboriginal aquaculture site in Victoria.

The two designations join a list of revered heritage sites such as the Sydney Opera House, the Taj Mahal and the Great Wall of China, and was announced by the world heritage committee in Baku, Azerbaijan on Sunday.

Eight of Lloyd Wright’s buildings, including Fallingwater, New York’s Guggenheim Museum and Los Angeles’ first world heritage site designation the Hollyhock House, have been inscribed as “The 20th Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright”.

Perennially the architect’s architect — Wright was named “the greatest American architect of all time” by the American Institute of Architects in 1991 — Frank Lloyd Wright championed an “organic architecture”, which described his integrated design approach to buildings that grow “naturally” from their context.

Wright often spoke of the democratic nature of design. Each of the buildings listed, the committee said, “offer innovative solutions to the needs for housing, worship, work or leisure”.

“Wright’s work from this period had a strong impact on the development of modern architecture in Europe.”


The 20th Century Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright

▲ Fallingwater. Mill Run, Pennsylvania.
▲ Fallingwater. Mill Run, Pennsylvania.

▲ Hollyhock House. Los Angeles, California.
▲ Hollyhock House. Los Angeles, California.

Frank Lloyd Wright.
▲ Unity Temple. Oak Park, Illinois.

▲ The Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House. Madison, Wisconsin.
▲ The Herbert and Katherine Jacobs House. Madison, Wisconsin.

Frank Lloyd Wright.
▲ Taliesin West. Scottsdale, Arizona

The Frederick C. Robie House. Chicago, Illinois.
▲ The Frederick C. Robie House. Chicago, Illinois.

Taliesin. Spring Green, Wisconsin.
▲Taliesin. Spring Green, Wisconsin.

Indigenous aquaculture site Budj Bim added to World Heritage List

▲Budj Bim was created about 6,600 years ago by the Gunditjmara people, it is the 20th Australian site to make the world heritage list.
▲Budj Bim was created about 6,600 years ago by the Gunditjmara people, it is the 20th Australian site to make the world heritage list.


The Budj Bim Cultural Landscape in southwest Victoria has been recognised as one of the oldest aquaculture networks in the world.

The ancient site is the first in Australia to be recognised based on its Aboriginal cultural importance.

“Composed of channels, dams and weirs, they are used to contain floodwaters and create basins to trap, store and harvest the kooyang eel, which has provided the population with an economic and social base for six millennia,” the committee said.

Gunditjmara Elder Denise Lovett said that it was a “very special day for our community”.

“This landscape, which we have cared for over thousands of years, is so important to Gunditjmara People.

“The decision also recognises Budj Bim’s significance to all of humanity. We are so proud to now be able to share our achievements and story with the world.”

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Article originally posted at: https://theurbandeveloper.com/articles/unesco-names-8-frank-lloyd-wright-buildings-on-world-heritage-list